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"Maximizing Storage in Your Campervan: Pop Top vs. Standard High Roof Comparison"

Updated: Apr 3

There is never enough space to fit 4+ people in a short-wheelbase van (Sprinter 144, Transit 148) with 4 seats, two beds, and gear.  These models, even a high roof van or a high roof sprinter van, need help to accommodate sleeping and living essentials for more than four occupants without compromising on space.


Have you noticed that all the social media and marketing posts about camper van storage solutions never really show people sleeping with gear? It’s like going to a model home that is staged–it looks perfect until you move in and find it’s not nearly as big as you thought.


In reality, your van looks like this when on a trip with gear and this is with a single bed.



"Maximizing Storage in Your Campervan: Pop Top vs. Standard High Roof Comparison"

With two beds, you have gear storage issues, not to mention that when you sleep, you are basically looking up at a ceiling a few inches above you. If you spent years in the Navy, you're used to it, but it's likely something you don't want to experience. You can't sit up either, and you can't relax. Isn't that the whole idea of a campervan?


"Maximizing Storage in Your Campervan: Pop Top vs. Standard High Roof Comparison"

So, what is the ideal solution to gain more space? A Pop Top Camper with interior access; it’s a game changer and you will never outgrow the van.


The downside? Yes, these cost more money however you will not outgrow the van, it’s like adding another entire room to you van!


 Are there different options? See our blog comparing the two best tops:  https://www.cacampervan.com/post/pop-top-comparison


Transit Mid Roof with Colorado Campervan (CCV) Pop Top and Sprinter with CCV Pop Top

"Maximizing Storage in Your Campervan: Pop Top vs. Standard High Roof Comparison"

From left to right, high roof sprinter with AC no pop top, low roof with CCV pop top, Promaster Low Roof with CCV Pop Top

"Maximizing Storage in Your Campervan: Pop Top vs. Standard High Roof Comparison"


ROOF TOP TENT


Good idea...kinda. It's way up there, and you have to go outside to get to it. You need a roof rack or rails to access it. It's one thing having this on a Subaru, but on a van 9 feet up in the air, you are asking for a trip to the emergency room. Cost: $6-12k.




Pop Top Camper Van


Interior access


SCA/Westfalia type pop top, triangle style. These are great pop tops for super low-profile roofs. There can be limits on what you put on the roof (like a fan, solar, or gear) however, it provides you inside access. These generally are not insulated so not ideal for cold camping. Cost: $15-20K.



Sportsmobile Top

A great choice with more room. However, they can only go on a low roof van and a vent cannot be added to the top.  It’s an older design, but tried and true. The bed inside can lift with the top which is a nice feature on a low roof to get more headspace.


These are a good choice if you have a low roof and don't need a fan. Cost: $16-25k



Top Weekender Van Conversion Choice


Colorado Campervan Pop Top (CCV)


Very large, insulated, provides inside access, and can be fitted with a rack, insulation, fan, and even AC on top. They are a few inches taller as compared to other choices, but the space you gain is huge. Cost: $18-25k



Low Roof Version- even wider than the high roof sprinter van


Colorado Campervan Pop Top, solar, fan, AC, and a Starlink! - you can't fit this stuff on any other pop top.


How do we solve the challenge of sleeping 4+, seating 4+, a dinette, and storing gear?


See a few examples in these build threads:


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